2011 Roster Evaluations: Running Backs

Packers RB Brandon SaineIn a year where Aaron Rodgers’ arm fueled most of the offensive production, the Green Bay backfield was left in the shadows. James Starks picked up where he left off in the prior postseason, leaving many to believe he would become the feature back by December. Instead, a late-season resurgence by Ryan Grant kept the backfield split through the final match in January.

Kudos to Mike McCarthy for calling plays around each of his backs’ strengths rather than inserting any back into running plays. Grant, a known liability inside the tackles, used his speed to turn standard sweeps into sizable gains. Starks resumed his role as the “slasher”, picking up the dirty yards inside. John Kuhn saw increased goal line work and remained a fan favorite, picking up a pro bowl nomination in the process.

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2011 Roster Evaluations: Receivers

Out of all the positional groups on the Green Bay roster, I find the receiving corps the most difficult to grade. On paper, you have one of the most talented groups of receivers of the past decade. The question is: did they live up to all the hype? With Greg Jennings, Jordy Nelson, Jermichael Finley and Donald Driver all in the same offense, the expectations were high.

In 2011, it was no longer Greg Jennings and Donald Driver that defensive coordinators lost sleep over. Rather, it was Jennings and new versatile threat Jordy Nelson that gave defensive backs problems. Nelson became a master of the wide receiver screen and routinely made cheating safeties pay downfield. Nelson’s breakout season was the all-around best of any Packers receiver in 2011. Continue reading

2011 Roster Evaluations: Offensive Line

It’s pretty difficult for a quarterback to finish the season north of 30 touchdown passes without adequate protection up front. Similarly, a 45-touchdown, 6-interception season requires sheer excellence out of the offensive line. Aaron Rodgers’ MVP numbers hint at the type of season the offensive line experienced in 2011.

In his contract year, Scott Wells turned in one of his finest seasons as a Packer, giving Ted Thompson lots to think about as the veteran center becomes a free agent. Ball security between Wells and Rodgers was almost never an issue, nor was pre-snap communication. Without a capable backup behind him on the depth chart, Wells was able to remain healthy and productive for the entire year.

Fans looked for four-year guard Josh Sitton to capture the pro bowl spot he earned in 2010, but were disappointed. Sitton was held to a high standard and failed to create gaping holes inside for James Starks on a consistent basis. Though he was not remarkably better than Sitton, T.J. Lang filled in nicely for the overrated Daryn Colledge and should retain the left guard spot for years to come.

Interior Offensive Line Grade: A-

The Packers experienced a health crisis at offensive tackle in 2011 and handled it brilliantly (compared to the absolute disaster in 2009 that didn’t even result from injury). Youngsters Marshall Newhouse and Derek Sherrod played admirably when called upon – especially Newhouse, who manned the left tackle position for the majority of the season.

Bryan Bulaga excelled at right tackle in 2011 and proved that he has the potential to protect Rodgers’ blindside, if that situation arises next season. While Chad Clifton made the most of his limited playing time in 2011, it’s hard to imagine the Packers bringing back the 35 year-old veteran with a wealth of talent behind him on the depth chart.

Exterior Offensive Line Grade: B+

2011 Roster Evaluations: Defensive Line

For a Packers’ front three that played such an important role in the 2010 playoffs (Raji’s pick six, Green’s pressure turned-pick six), the 2011 defensive line was quite ordinary. The missing piece to the puzzle was obviously pass rushing phenom Cullen Jenkins, who was too expensive to resign in the offseason. Clearly, Ted Thompson had no idea how anemic the pass rush up front would be without Jenkins.

With defensive end Mike Neal still nursing a 2010 knee injury, the Packers opened 2011 in classic Thompson-like form: whoever sat behind Neal on the depth chart was now the starter. Three-year vet Jarius Wynn teased fans with a surprisingly impressive opener against the Saints – and then proceeded to play like the sixth round end that had him watching from the sidelines for most of his time in Green Bay. Continue reading

2011 Roster Evaluations: Linebackers

Experts will give mixed impressions of the performance of the Green Bay linebackers in 2011. Like many other positional groups on the Packers’ roster, the corps had its ups and downs. The run defense had some rough outings, like those against Minnesota and Chicago (at home), but still finished the season a respectable 14th in rushing yards allowed.  The abysmal performance of the pass defense, however, must be reflected in the outside linebackers’ grade.

Ted Thompson’s choice to add just one late-round draft pick to the platoon at right outside linebacker proved to be a poor one as the rotation routinely came up short opposite of Clay Matthews. Erik Walden was not the same force that got to quarterbacks late in 2010 while Brad Jones played so poorly in camp that many thought he would get cut. Continue reading

2011 Roster Evaluations: Defensive Backs

The performance of the Green Bay secondary in 2011 was tainted by the loss of Nick Collins in Week 2. Through just a few games, fans and experts discovered Collins’ substantial value to the proclaimed best secondary in football. It became evident that second-year safety Morgan Burnett couldn’t carry Charlie Peprah’s weight the same way Collins could in 2010.

Miscommunications between the safeties and cornerbacks were common, resulting in home run plays from the opposition. The meeting between San Diego and Detroit (at home) were particularly painful as big receivers Vincent Jackson and Calvin Johnson teed off on Tramon Williams. At the same time, the Packer secondary managed their same turnover prowess for most of the season – despite close to no pass rush up front. Continue reading

Sunday’s Loss Adds to the Recent Playoff Heartache

This year’s Green Bay Packers looked like a team on a mission. Like a team destined to end up in Indianapolis and atone for the franchise’s Super Bowl loss 14 years ago in San Diego. Since that fateful day on the West Coast, the Packers have had some of the toughest playoff defeats of all the teams in the NFL. Where does Sunday’s loss sit on that list?  Continue reading

A Giant Disappointment

The Packers confirmed Sunday the abnormally long list of flaws that had fans of the 15-1 NFC North champs on the edge of their seats all season long. The deep-rooted problems lie on defense, though miscues like dropped passes and fumbles played a major role in the loss. It was sheer sluggishness that cemented the Packers’ fate though, as Green Bay kissed their magical season goodbye in front of a hopeful Lambeau audience.

Let’s pretend for a second that the Packers at least played a fundamentally sound game, free of turnovers and dropped passes. We suddenly have a ball game…but would it have even translated into anything? Sunday proved that Green Bay’s reliance on a 40-points-per-game offense wasn’t going to cut it down the stretch. The defense simply wasn’t good enough to bail out any less-than-perfect performance by the offense. Continue reading

Title Game Berth Could Be Decided in Trenches

It’s not worth comparing this Sunday’s divisional playoff matchup to the 2007 NFC title game that saw the New York Giants knock off No.4 and the second-seeded Green Bay Packers.

Both teams have changed dramatically over the past four years, as have most teams in the league. In 2008, the Packers handed the franchise reins over to Aaron Rodgers and then employed a new defensive scheme. The Giants have since become much more pass-happy on offense. However, one aspect of Tom Coughlin’s Giants has not changed in four years: the prowess seen in the Giants’ defensive line.  Continue reading

One Thing is For Sure: There Will Be a Market for Matt Flynn

Green Bay Packers' Matt FlynnStill unknown is how Ted Thompson will allocate the franchise tag, a long-term contract and a wave farewell to pending free agents Jermichael Finley, Scott Wells and Matt Flynn. Flynn’s performance in Week 17 against the Lions has Thompson reevaluating any predetermined personnel moves he had been planning. One factor Thompson doesn’t need to consider when performing his analysis: the existence of a free agent market for Flynn.

In analyzing the market for Flynn, I separate potential buyers into groups based on their apparent need at quarterback. There appear to be three types of QB-needy teams this offseason: the desperate, the contemplating and the indecisive. While the teams listed in the third category may come off as long shots, their influence on the flow of rookie and free agent quarterbacks should not be disregarded. Continue reading